Tag Archives: video

Collaborative Media Annotation (Part 1)

videoant

Writing notes on the media we consume can help us focus and record our thoughts as we go. This can be a powerful tool for quick review and useful in preparing for further investigation of a topic. By bringing annotation into a collaborative process, we can transform individual insight into a wiki-like educational experience, where the context of an idea is preserved, but the audience has shifted.

VIDEO VideoANT (http://ant.umn.edu/) allows for the easy creation and sharing of annotated video. Their platform allows you to take almost any YouTube video and wrap it an interface that makes annotation easy. You can also use flv, mp4, and mov files from elsewhere on the web. Unfortunately it won’t take links directly from Median.

rapgenius

TEXT Collaborative annotation site RapGenius, where you can go to learn what many songs on the radio are actually saying, boasts an impressive and ever-expanding collection of annotated lyrics. 

Sibling sites for news, poetry, and other genres of music have been developed and now you can utilize it for (some of) your own texts thanks to the EducationGenius project.

Portions of selected literary classics in the public domain are already online with media-rich community driven annotations.

 

GETTING STARTED

See this great how-to guide by Nathan Hall for a full walkthrough on VideoANT: http://nathanghall.wordpress.com/2013/05/29/videoant-online-video-annotation-and-commenting/

For some ideas on how to use RapGenius in your class, see this post EducationGenius:
http://poetry.rapgenius.com/Genius-educators-teaching-with-rap-genius-lyrics

 

LOOKING AHEAD
A future post will discuss Mozilla’s PopcornMaker, a tool that allows for multiple layers of media to be displayed on a single timeline.

Add captions to your video

You can add captions to your video though YouTube and have the option of exporting the captions for use elsewhere.

Captions enhance the accessibility of videos, and allows us, as described by Google, to “make the world’s information universally accessible and useful.”

The following video demonstrates how captions and subtitles work in YouTube: